Clinical Gestalt And Beliefs Analysis

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Running head: BELIEFS, VALUES, AND CLINICAL GESTALT Beliefs, Values, and Clinical Gestalt University of Phoenix BSHS 322 Monique Foster August 01, 2011 Beliefs, Values, and Clinical Gestalt Personal and Professional Assumptions I personally grew up to love people regardless of race, sex, social status, or any other differences. I have never been one to judge others. The text stated that “we should surround ourselves with people different from ourselves, people with whom we can discuss honest questions and feedback” (Murphy & Dillion, 2003, p.13). My personal assumptions and beliefs come from my family values and how I was reared. The values and beliefs that a person grows up with are how they view the world, until they…show more content…
I grew up Christian, but have friends that are of other religions. Their values are different from mine. They view the world in a different way than I do, and they are teaching their families those same values. I was raised in a church that believed a woman and man should be married- not two people of the same sex. That is a view that I cannot bring into my practice while counseling someone about same-sex marriage. It has been my experience as I have gotten older that some of my closest friends are homosexuals and I love them as much as any of my other heterosexual friends. I want them to be happy in their life with whomever they choose to be with, male or female. In the main forum that several people commented they would have trouble with someone who sexually abused a child and they would have a problem counseling the abuser. I think that would definitely be a challenging person to counsel, especially for me since I was sexually abused as a child. I would do much better counseling a child that was abused and not the abuser. Clinicians need to use the knowledge and awareness that they gain from their lives to help…show more content…
He was the father of client-centered therapy. He believed that patients should basically learn to understand themselves, so they could help themselves (Hall, 2007). It is an interesting theory that Rogers had in those early days of practicing as a psychotherapist. “Rogers started to use the expression ‘client’ instead of ‘patient’ due to the fact that the individuals that he was counseling did need help but not within the same regard that a medically ill person does” (Hall, 2007). In 2011, it is common practice to call a person seeking therapy a client instead of a patient thanks to Carl Rogers (Hall, 2007). I had not studied about Carl Rogers before this class. I think it makes sense not to call the person seeking counseling a patient, but instead client sounds more dignified. In the main forum during week 2, we discussed empathy and sympathy. I answered that empathy is the ability to feel, share, and recognize the feelings of another person. A person with empathy is compassionate, and is an important part of counseling. A counselor needs to be able to put themselves into the situation of their client and try to understand how they may be feeling
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