Civil War Segregation

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When the civil war ended in 1865, slavery was abolished, and black-white relations in the South entered a new era. The southern system of race relations that ultimately followed after the Civil War was designed partly to keep control of black labour that was institutionalized under slavery. Also, it was intended to eliminate any political or economic threat from the black community. This system grew to be highly oppressive, slavery left a strong tradition of racism in the white community. The system of race relations that replaced slavery in the South was segregation, also called the Jim Crow system . In segregation, the minority group is physically and socially separated from the dominant group and consigned to an inferior position in almost…show more content…
According to Holt the major effect of segregation on young children is the sense that one group is inferior to the other. She thinks that the fact of segregation in itself, is very important because it allows for legal sanctions to a policy that is perceived by both whites and blacks as denoting to the African American population . Schools in Topeka were only segregated in the earlier years of education, junior and senior high school years were integrated. To the question ‘if black students could overcome the effects of earlier segregation,’ Holt argues that studies have found that achievement of individuals in their later jobs can be predicted at first grade, and therefore, she said that ‘simply removing segregation at a somewhat later grade could not undo the effects of earlier segregation’ . Professor Speer testifies in the case by explaining the word ‘curriculum’ and how it makes a difference in the case. Speer defines ‘curriculum’ as the total school experience of the child, including the lessons, but also the child’s total development, personality, and personal and social adjustment . He believes that it’s the obligation of the schools, to provide a environment in which a child can learn, not only literally in the classroom, but also in their social environment, for example the interaction with…show more content…
It weakens the democratic ideas of a society dedicated to freedom, justice, and equality. He explains in his brief that ‘the proposition that all men are created equal is not mere rhetoric. It implies a rule of law – an indispensable condition to a civilized society – under which all men stand equal and alike in the rights and opportunities secured to them by their government’ . Consequently, racial discrimination must be reviewed in the name of a free democracy, so other countries can follow the United States’
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