Child Labor In The Industrial Revolution

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The Industrial Revolution, the era of greatly increased output of machine-made goods, began in England in the 1700s. This revolution led to worldwide advancement in machinery and increase in economies everywhere. There were many factors in which were the reason of that the Industrial Revolution began in England. The geographic location, the inventions present within the society, and the political stability of England all contributed to said Revolution, presenting the factors of production that Britain had that others did not; land, labor, and capital. One of the reasons that the Industrial Revolution began in England was the geographic location of England itself, as for it allowed England to harbor many of the important resources.…show more content…
As explained by Friedrich Engles, people only regard each other only as useful objects, exploiting one another. Engels also explains that in the end, the stronger treads the weaker under foot. This philosophy applies to all laborers in the factories within the eighteenth and nineteenth century, in particular the children in said factories. Child labor would be used for cheap labor in which allowed for the factory owners to hire these workers for little wages and to maximize their own profits. This evil of child labor was addressed in many acts and reforms of the government. One such reform would be the Health and Morals Act of 1802. This act established the minimum age of employment to be nine years, and that the working day for children under fourteen to be limited to twelve hours. This was the first addressing to the works of child labor. Later on, in 1833, the Factory Act was established. This act enacted that no one under 18 years shall work at night in any sort of factory where any mechanical power is used to work the machinery. The Factory Act also built upon the Health and Morals act of 1802, establishing that those under the age of 18 years cannot work more than 12 hours in one day, nor more than 69 hours in one week. This confrontation of the evil of child labor ultimately causes the actions of child labor to be inefficient…show more content…
In Europe, the inconspicuous arrival of the revolution led the many other revolutions in industries, mainly in the textile industry. As textile manufacture went from home to the factory, so did thousands of English women. Even though they are vastly far apart, Japan also received a very common affect on the women. Japan’s new government of enlightened rule set off on a campaign to make Japan an equal to Western nations, investing in coal mines, textile mills and many other modern enterprises in an effort to put Japan on an equal economic footing with the west. Due to this conversion into Western economics, so did the women in terms of economics. The Female mill workers in England and Japan share many experiences, such as working conditions, the types of women that were hired to work, and the wages that were received by these
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