Child Abuse Laws Essay

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Child abuse laws: How adequate are they? 4/30/2012 Rasmussen College Leila Mayfield-Dillard Leila A. Mayfield-Dillard English Composition Child Abuse Laws: How adequate are they? Child abuse is a blanket term to describe 4 types of child mistreatment; physical, emotional, neglect and sexual. In many cases children are victims to more than one type of abuse. Abuse occurs among all ethnic, social and income groups. Current child abuse laws are inadequate because that statute of limitations allows offenders to go free and the sentences handed down do not match the severity of the crime. Neglect counts for nearly half of the reported cases of abuse, physical 25%, emotional 3%, and sexual abuse committed by adults counts for 10% of reported cases but receives the most attention when reported to the proper authorities. The notion that children are property of their parents masks the extent of child abuse. Sex offenders are often time not punished for their crimes because of the statutes of limitations in some states. Some SOLs begin running at the time of the injury and others begin running when the injury is discovered. In cases with minors the SOL is “tolled” or doesn’t begin running until the minor turns 18. Let’s look at the state of Minnesota vs. the state of Illinois, and compare how each state’s SOL differ from the other. Minnesota’s civil statue (541.073-2008), states that a minor has until the age of 18 plus 6 years to bring a claim against an offender. The criminal statue (628.26-e-2008) and (628.26.K) states that a minor has only up to 9 years after the commission of the offense, if failed to do so then 3 years after the offense was reported to law enforcement , to bring a claim against an offender, if failed to do so then 3 years after the offense was reported to law enforcement to bring a claim against an offender; however Minnesota’s

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