Intermolecular Attraction (Dispersion Force, Or Hydrogen Bond) Exists In Each Of The Following Liquids

1612 Words7 Pages
Which type of intermolecular attraction (dispersion force, or hydrogen bond) exists in each of the following liquids? hydrogen bond hydrogen bond dispersion force hydrogen bond Predict which liquid in each pair has the higher boiling point. CH3COOH C2H5OH If the molecules in a liquid are weakly attracted, which of the following properties has a high value? vapor pressure (high when attraction is low) boiling point is low (it is only high when molecules are strongly attracted) viscosity is low (it is only high when molecules are strongly attracted) surface tension is low (it is only high when molecules are strongly attracted) Distinguish between a solid and a liquid at the molecular level. Solids and liquids differ at…show more content…
Na2CO3 10H2O Ni(NO3)2 6H2O CoCl3 8H2O Cr(C2H3O2)3 H2O CHAPTER 13 NOTES Lesson 13.1 Properties of liquids: - liquids have a variable shape, but a fixed volume. - liquids usually flow at different rates. - liquids don’t compress or expand significantly. - liquids have a high density in comparison to gases. - soluble gases mix homogeneously. Lesson 13.2 The intermolecular bond concept: vapor pressure, viscosity, and surface tension are determined by strength of molecular attraction. electrons in a nonpolar molecule are constantly shifting about. Dispersion force - temporary dipole attractions that can occur between nonpolar molecules. dispersion forces occur frequently for short periods of time. Dipole force - this permanent force operates between polar molecules. - a polar molecule has regions of positive and negative charge. Hydrogen bond - highly polar bond capable of producing a strong dipole force between molecules. the dipole attraction is typically about 10% of the strength of a normal covalent…show more content…
high melting point, hard, brittle, slightly soluble in water, conductor of electricity when melted or in solution Molecular solid - crystalline solid that has molecules arranged in a particular configuration. low melting point, generally insoluble in water, nonconductor of electricity. Metallic solid - crystalline solid that has atoms of metals arranged in a definite pattern. low to high melting point, malleable, ductile, conductor of electricity, insoluble in most solvents. Lesson 13.6 Changes of physical state: * necessary to draw a temperature-energy graph to see the change in temperature with a constant application of heat Heat of fusion - the amount of heat required to melt 1.00 g of substance. substance changing from a solid to a liquid. Heat of vaporization - the amount of heat required to vaporize 1.00 g of a substance. substance changing from a liquid to a gas. heats of vaporization and condensation are equal. Lesson 13.7 Structure of water: For the electron dot formula, it is necessary to provide the octet (4 electron pairs). (the molecular shape of water is bent) Bond angle - the angle formed by the central atom and two attached

More about Intermolecular Attraction (Dispersion Force, Or Hydrogen Bond) Exists In Each Of The Following Liquids

Open Document