Chaos In The Crucible

852 Words4 Pages
Throughout the Chaos With the slightest spark of fear the entire story of The Crucible was set in motion. Characters revealed their true identities; some took the righteous path, while others used dishonesty and scheming as defense mechanisms. John Proctor, Abigail Williams, and Reverend Hale all had different “moral” perspectives. John Proctor, a man of strong moral constitution, held himself to a high standard for the sake of his good name and family. However, due to his lust, he struggled with a major internal conflict throughout the play. To begin with, Proctor was considered a strong person in the town, and he was respected for it. In the beginning his attitude was described as “… even-tempered, and not easily led” (19). However, soonwe…show more content…
She repeatedly lied to save herself by denying her involvement in witchcraft. For example when she said: “Now look you, all of you, we danced, and Tituba conjured Ruth Putnam’s dead sisters, and that is all. And mark this. Let either of you breathe a word…” (19). Abigail’s jealousy of Elizabeth Proctor intensified as she realized her desire for Elizabeth’s husband, John Proctor. She told Mary Warren to innocently give Elizabeth a poppet she had sewn, with a needle inside stuck for “safekeeping”. Abigail, used this to her advantage, stuck a needle into her own stomach, claimed Elizabeth’s “familiar spirit” did so, a story supported by the needle in the poppet. A court official talked of how Abigail screamed like a struck beast, which emphasized the authenticity of Abigail’s acting and how easily she manipulated influential court officials by telling them what they need to hear, to be able toprosecute Elizabeth (53-73). Not only did she lie, and manipulate people she also stole from her uncle, Reverend Parris, and then vanished ( ). Abigail is the clear antagonist or villain in this…show more content…
Hale knew a lot about witchcraft; but he knew almost nothing about the people of Salem or the controversy that was wracking the town at first. In the beginning he sounded pompous and arrogant when he said “have no fear now, we shall find out if he has come among us, and I mean to crush him utterly if he has shown his face!” (37). This showshow he felt the pride of the specialist whose unique knowledge was publically called for. Hale believed resolutely in the absolute power of church and affiliated himself in Salem as solely through the church and the court. When Goody Proctor suspected Reverend Hale accused her of witchcraft, he said that this is his duty “to add what I may tot the Godly wisdom of the court” (64). Reverend Hale defended his work and still stood steadfastly behind his intentions. The proceedings of the Salem Witch Trials induce a remarkable transformation in the beliefs of Reverend Hale. He had a sudden revelation while he listened to John Proctor and Mary Warren in Act Four; he became convinced that they, not Abigail were telling the truth. He changed from the advocator who encouraged the accused to confess to witchcraft to the challenger who opposed witch trials altogether. As his belief in witchcraft falters, so does his faith in the law. After Danforth arrests Giles and
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