Carrasquillo And Rodriguez Chapter 1 Summary

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Carrasquillo & Rodriguez, Chapter 1 New York State Education Department, Chapter 2 Regardless of language, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, students from bilingual, ESL and LEP programs are assigned to mainstreamed classrooms in the United States. A thoughtful and appropriate mainstream classroom can provide a unique, progressive and cooperative learning environment for ESL, ELL and bilingual students. However, if educators disregard the significance of comprehending learning needs of linguistically diverse students, the corresponding environment can be destructive and unfair. Teachers need to commit to helping empower these students to be confident not only in literacy development but in different content areas. In order…show more content…
Without an appropriate background, teachers can inadvertently isolate or alienate LEP students who need to feel like they are “part of the instructional setting” so a positive self-image is preserved (Carrasquillo & Rodriguez, 2001). Often, LEP students need special language programs which will supplement their learning needs fairly. Because of the rise of “immigrants and high fertility rates among linguistically and culturally diverse groups in the United States,” (Carrasquillo & Rodriguez, 2001) the number of students in need of special resources such as language development programs and better trained teachers is significant. Educators need to adapt teaching styles to fit the needs of these students because they are important of our country’s diverse…show more content…
Concepts and skills in literacy in one language will only transfer if they have been completely learned. Cummins calls this the “threshold hypothesis” and asserts that native language literacy can only transfer to a second language when students have reached a critical threshold in their native language” (New York State Education Department, 2000). When educators are appropriately trained to inspire LEP students to achieve to their greatest potential in their native language, these students will build confidence and skills in the second language. Teachers need to be proactive in ensuring LEP students have full access to content material and literacy experiences to help promote meaningful problem-solving and
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