External Experts In Schools

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The use of external experts by schools is widespread and there are many external professionals who may work with schools on an ad-hoc or regular basis. These experts will usually bring a high degree of specific professional knowledge and specialist skills which teachers themselves may not have. Teachers may work these professionals to directly support children and young people with their educational, health or social needs. Equally, professionals may go into schools to provide specialist training to teachers to enable them to do their jobs more effectively. Schools under Local Authority maintenance will be supported by a team of educational experts who will provide training and support linked to national initiatives. Local Authorities…show more content…
This may be difficulty producing and using speech, understanding and using language or with other voice problems or stammers. They will also help children who are having difficulties with feeding, chewing or swallowing. The main aim of the SLT is to help the individual develop the best possible communication skills in light of their difficulties. For some, this might be spoken communication but for others it might be learning to use communication aids or signs, symbols or gestures. When working with children SLTs also work with carers and teachers to give them the skills to assist children in practise in the school and home…show more content…
It is their responsibility to support Head teachers in producing the School Improvement Plan. This is a one year plan which links the School Self Review process and budget. The School Improvement Plan is formulated, by the Head Teacher and Governors, using information gathered from an analysis of data of school attainment together with feedback from all stakeholders including staff, governors, parents, carers and children. The purpose of the school improvement plan is to review and evaluate the impact of previous developments, identify key areas for school improvement over the coming year and to outline the action to be taken in key areas. The school budget is then matched to the priorities for the School Improvement Plan. Historically, a School Improvement Partner would visit schools for three to five days a year to support Head Teachers in this process. However, the Government wishes to provide schools with more autonomy in deciding what school improvement support looks like. As a consequence, from 2011 they removed the duty on local authorities to provide school improvement partners to each of their maintained schools. Schools are able to buy in this type of support from their own budgets should they feel it is
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