Brutal Force: The Russian Revolution

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Brutal Force Throughout the many years and before the start of the Russian Revolution, violence, coercion, terror and compromise played a big role in enforcing the government and in making the people and revolutionaries in Russia happy so there would be no overthrow of leading government officials. As we see in the October Manifesto, the tsar was compelled to sign the document to compromise with the people only so he would not be overthrown or executed, also in the Constitution of 1918 and 1924 which were written to establish the new state of Russia and to help keep the new state in tact. We also see acts of violence to help keep rule and enforce government through Bloody Sunday and State and Revolution written by Lenin. The use of compromise…show more content…
There were signs of an early revolution in the making when the people had had enough off being ruled by an autocratic government. On January 9, 1905 in St. Petersburg, the civilians of Russia peacefully marched to the palace of the tsar with just a simple compromise in which the Russian government was not very fond of due to the fact that they thought an autocratic government was the only government that could rule Russia. They ordered to soldiers to open fire on the demonstrators killing nearly 1,000 people. Russian’s were furious with this and throughout the year, they went on strikes in which one strike paralyzed the country, which then compelled Nicholas the second to grant civil and political freedoms to the people. The document was known as The October Manifesto. In the early years of the revolution, there are acts of government violence and compromise, also seen later in the revolution. (Weinberg,…show more content…
“Russia is hereby proclaimed a Republic of Soviets of Workers’, Soldiers’ and Peasants’ Deputies. All power, centrally and locally, is vested in these Soviets” (Const. of 1918, 17). “The Russian Soviet republic is established on the principle of a free union of free nations, as a federation of soviet national republics” (Const. of 1918, 17). The Bolsheviks wrote this to the people to con them to come back on the Bolsheviks side, though the Bolsheviks were not actually going to follow through with it like we seen with the tsar an the October Manifesto. In the 1920s the Bolsheviks were emerging victorious from the Civil War. Though they had recognized the independence of former tsarist territories, they wanted to retain the East Slavic lands, and later reconquer the states of South Caucasus and Central Asia. The question of nationalism then came up due to the fact that most of the people in these states were non-Russian, in which the Constitution took a form of a treaty, ostensibly among a set of independent socialist republics (including the RSFSR), which established a federation or union (Const. of 1924, 22). “The Union of Socialist Soviet Republics through its supreme organs has the following powers: To represent the Union in its international relations; to conclude treaties, political and
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