Breast Cancer In Latino Women

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Breast Cancer in Latino Women Abstract Americans counted as Hispanic/Latino by the US Census Bureau come from very different ethnic backgrounds and nations—ranging from Argentina to Mexico to Puerto Rico (American Cancer Society). Breast cancer is not as common in Latino women as it is in their sisters of Caucasian or African American descent. One would expect that news to be good and exciting however, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Latino women. Their five year survival rate is the lowest among all ethnic groups. In the 2002 US Census the Latino community is the largest growing minority (CBS News, 2007). The number of diagnosed cases of breast cancer will increase along with the Latino population. This…show more content…
They tend to smoke less, drink less and eat healthier. Normally they have multiple births in their early childbearing years. The problem for Latino women is that once breast cancer has been diagnosed it is usually found in very advanced stages. Why is this happening? The most prevalent factors appear to be education, lack of insurance or the financial means to obtain information on breast cancer or prescreening tests. Bilingual material discussing breast cancer and the importance of early detection are not in abundance. Many Latino women do not speak English well enough to communicate with health officials. Because this is a personal matter, Latino women are more comfortable discussing the issue in Spanish, and the numbers of health officials who speak Spanish are few. Many of these women feel intimidated and seek no preventative medical care. Because these women are not familiar with the health care system they do not know what questions to ask or where they should go for answers and information. A Latino woman might not know about clinical trials or how to ask if they can became part of…show more content…
Latino women believe if they touch their breasts to much or have mammograms too often this increases their chances of getting breast cancer. If a Latino woman has never had an injury to her breasts she might falsely believe she has no reason to worry about Breast Cancer. Some Latino have superstitious beliefs that if one talks too much about breast cancer, it will cause the cancer to happen (Ruiz, 2004). Latino women tend to take care of their families first. They tend to themselves last, so that the needs of their families are met first. Any preventive medical care is not high on the list of importance. Lack of money, education and a language barrier contribute to the under utilization of screening and preventative yearly mammograms. Many Latinos do not have insurance or their insurance does not cover prescreening exams. Older women tend to believe that they are past the age of
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