Bowlby's Attachment Theory

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AO2 AO2 AO1 AO1 In contrast to this, Rutter et al (2007) studied 100 Romanian orphans and assessed them at 4, 6 and 11 years old. The children who had been adopted by British families before the age of 6 months have shown normal emotional development. This suggests that long term consequences may be less severe than thought if they are able to effectively form attachments at a young age. In this study one third of children recovered well which suggests that it is more likely that there are more factors e.g. poor subsequent care and parent disharmony In contrast to this, Rutter et al (2007) studied 100 Romanian orphans and assessed them at 4, 6 and 11 years old. The children who had been adopted by British families before the age of 6 months have shown normal emotional development. This suggests that long term consequences may be less severe than thought if they are able to effectively form attachments at a young age. In this study one third of children recovered well which suggests that it is more likely that there are more factors e.g. poor subsequent care and parent disharmony One study supporting Bowlby’s theory of a ‘critical period’ is the example of Genie. Genie was locked in a room by her father until she was 13 and a half. When she was ‘found’ she could not stand erect, and could not speak. She never fully recovered socially. She showed a disinterest to other people. Her lack of recovery may be due to her extreme emotional privation or it may be due to her late age she was ‘discovered’, this links with Bowlby’s sensitive age for effective attachment, which is primarily between 6-9 months and up to 2 years and so after this time she was unable to effectively form attachments One study supporting Bowlby’s theory of a ‘critical period’ is the example of Genie. Genie was locked in a room by her father until she was 13 and a half. When she was ‘found’

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