Boone County: The Great Flood Of 1937

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The Great Flood of 1937 In terms of geography, Boone County sits as Kentucky’s northernmost county and the borders of my home county have always been defined by the great Ohio River. Boone County was a place of great farm lands and always relied on the river for the needs to grow various crops especially the cash crop of tobacco. In fact, the local commerce of Boone County, especially in 1937, was in handling all things related to agriculture such as beef, milk, corn, and seed supply. This reliance on agriculture and small subsistence farming allowed Boone County to fair far better during the Great Depression in the 1930s, more so than there neighbors to the north in Cincinnati, Ohio. While being close in distance, these two areas could…show more content…
While the WPA, Works Progress Administration, under the New Deal of President Roosevelt was busy helping trapped people in the cities of Covington and Newport. The Red Cross was the main helping hand to the citizens of Boone County offering vaccines, food and shelter. “The residents who remain there are making their living quarters in the school building. They have been cared for by the Red Cross and local donations” While I noted before that Boone County laid fairly untouched by the flood in comparison, the property damage was extremely high for a community built on agriculture but the one town which was hit the hardest was Constance. Constance, is located where the famed Anderson Ferry meets and transports people across the Ohio River. As such, Constance is a town dotted with marinas and houseboats. From the Recorder, “houses were twisted from their foundations and many have been completely destroyed or swept away by the high water” Luckily Boone County did not see the loss in lives as the cities of Cincinnati and Louisville did, whereas Boone County citizens were pushed away from their farms and homes, Cincinnati was dealing with fires throughout the city due to broken gas lines. Louisville according the headline in the Boone County Recorder had a death toll…show more content…
As towns and cities which dotted along the Ohio River were swept away by the flood. Yes the toll may have hit some places harder than others, but the effects and legacy of this time remain to this very day. There are markings on homes in Covington where spots show how high the flood rose and there are countless images of places such as Crosley Field which sat in a pool of river water in February 1937. Yet, the river did subside and people were able to move on from this tragedy. Farming in Boone County began again, business life picked back up in Cincinnati and the legendary Cincinnati Reds took to the field on Opening Day just as they have always done since 1881 as the oldest professional baseball team in the country. The people during this time of the 1930s were made with something a little special in my opinion. They had fought in World War I, fought through the Great Depression, fought through the Great Flood in 1937, and were about to fight through the Second World War. It is a generation which went through fire and came out as one of the great generations. Yes, the flood in 1937 did its fair share of damage to my hometown but the flood did not realize how close knit and strong willed these Boone County people were and still remain to this
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