Book Review Why Don T We Listen Better

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Tina Loayza Practical Book Review Liberty University Why don’t we listen better is about becoming an effective listener. It’s about not letting our emotions take over with listening and speaking. This book really made me realize what in-depth speaking and listening was all about. This book is divided into three parts; the physical structure of listening, being a talker and a listener, and ways to become a more effective listener. In the first part talk some of the flat brain theory in the flat brain syndrome (Peterson, 2007). The flat brain theory talks about how there are three parts to listening and our emotions. In the stomach serves one, function, this is where our feelings are located. When we feel something as what happened…show more content…
Both play very important roles in a conversation. It is important to learn to take turns, to make it a two-sided conversation (Peterson, 2007). Taking turns means someone goes first, so which person should be the first to speak? The first one to go should be the one that is most bothered. First though, you have to make sure that both parties are ready to listen. Being flat-brained isn’t going to make for a good listener, in this case, you would have to make a rain check for the conversation. Otherwise it will not be a very healthy chat. The talker with the biggest bother will talk, the listener will put himself in the talker’s shoes, and feel that persons bother as well. The talker owns the problem, but the listener will share the problem. It is important during this stage that the listener stays away from judgments, attacking, or…show more content…
The first part of labeling feelings is in determining who will talk first (Peterson, 2007). This is a good idea because it will determine which person has the biggest need for expression. However, I wonder, like myself at times, many people are a little over dramatic when they have certain feelings. I wonder if this would cause problems in a listener-talker relationship. For example, if I ran out of milk, to me this could be an overwhelming crisis, and I might label this a ten. The other person might have some real crisis, but they are a little easier going and label their issue as a 5. I wonder if this listener-talker relationship would dwindle. The listener in this situation might not have confidence in me anymore knowing how over-dramatic I might be. Then again, no one has the right to number my feelings, because they are my own (Peterson,
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