Black Plague Origin

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Between 1348 and 1350 Europe fell victim to a devastating sickness; the black plague. The origins of the black plague are debated by scholars however most historians believe it derived in the Gobi Desert. However, no one really knows why it started. The Black Death (other name for the black plague) came in three forms, the bubonic, pneumonic, and septicemic. The bubonic plague was the most commonly seen of the Black Death. The bubonic plague had a mortality rate of 30t-75%. The symptoms included high fever and inflamed lymph nodes. The pneumonic plague was the second most commonly seen illness from the Black Death. Its mortality rate was 90-95%. The reason it wasn’t so common was because the bubonic plague would kill them before it reached.…show more content…
This leaved the people coming up with theories to keep safe and rid themselves of the plague. Many believed that the disease was transmitted through the air. So the people turned to scents to ward off the deadly vapors. People burned all manner of incense: juniper, laurel, pine, beech, lemon leaves, rosemary, camphor, sulfer and others. Handkerchiefs were dipped in aromatic oils, to cover the face when going out. The cure of sound was also believed to be a remedy. Towns rang church bells to drive the plague away, because the ringing of town bells was done in crises of all kinds. Other towns fired cannons, which were new and which made comfortingly loud din. This rapid spread greatly effected Europe in the 14th century. The most pressing issue caused by the Black Death was the large number of deaths and the rate at which they were occurring. The death tolls varied from place to place in Europe, and an exact number of how much all together was killed is unknown. However, historians estimate anywhere from 75-200 million people died from the plague within the span of 4 years. In some cities as many as 500-800 people would die daily by this disease. This massive number of deaths greatly affected the economy in…show more content…
The Black Plague can be credited for the invention of this popular nursery rhyme: Ring a-round the rosy pocket full of posies ashes, ashes, we all fall down! The death of family members left the children facing pain at an early age. Parents even went as far as to abandoning their children, leaving them on the streets to fend for themselves. They didn’t want to risk their babies giving them the deadly disease. Children were especially unlucky if they were girls. Baby girls would be left to die because parents would favor male children that could carry on the family
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