Binge Drinking Research Paper

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Reduction of Underage and Binge Drinking in College Campuses A Social Ecological Model Approach Clare Kirungi Candidate for Masters in Public Health National University San Diego, California 2nd August, 2014 Submitted to Catie Chung, PhD RN Program: Health Promotion Strategies, COH618 Abstract Drinking affects all college students despite of their alcohol consumption statuses. Abusive and underage drinking has a toll on the social and intellectual lives of students across the United States of America. This paper explores interventions that could be implemented to prevent this public health issue using the social ecological model influences at interpersonal, community, and policy levels. According to the National Institute…show more content…
The SEM framework explains the effect of the interactions between the individual and his/her environment, and how this relationship can be used to develop interventions to influence behavioural change on five levels: individual, interpersonal, organisational, community and public policy. Most of the work done on prevention programs is based on the individual level. These programs focus on changing the beliefs of young people about alcohol by educating them on the pitfalls of underage binge drinking. Unfortunately such education and training is a waste in an environment that doesn’t advocate for it. This paper looks at ways in which the environmental interventions at the interpersonal, community and public policy levels can support individuals in their attempt to overcome underage binge…show more content…
These relationships encompass family, friends and peers. Peer interactions are crucial for college students in a way that peers become a source of guidance and support during the transition from high school to college life. Peers act as significant models by introducing, providing, or pressuring underage alcohol use and abuse. Direct or indirect encouragement from one’s own age group to engage in activities that they may or may not want to engage in is very important in the adoption of alcohol use (Palmeri, 2011). Direct peer pressure examples include eminently encouraging a peer to drink by offering him/her alcohol, or having one’s drink refilled without permission. Modelling of others’ drinking and observed drinking norms could be indirect ways an individual may pick up abusive alcohol practices (Palmeri, 2011). An example of this would be college students that attend Greek parties notice their peers drinking heavily which influences heavier drinking. This causes such students to view their drinking levels as less than their counterparts, yet in reality, their drinking levels are a lot higher. This knowledge can be used to develop strategies that work against underage binge
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