Benefits Of Lowering Drinking Age To 18

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Most teens are opened up to alcohol when they turn 18, which is the legal age to be considered an adult by the United States’ government, or their first semester of college. When teens first start drinking they do not know how to handle drinking alcohol. Most all college students participate in “pre-gaming”, which is where the kids will drink in their dorm room or other unsupervised places before they go out to a party or a get together. If we lowered the drinking age from 21 to 18 it would have more pros come out of it than cons such as it would teach kids more responsibility by taking alcohol classes and going through a process similar to the procedure someone has to go through to get their license, there would be a lower number of kids drinking…show more content…
When adolescents better to teach youth to learn how to drink responsibly and hold them accountable for their actions as we do with driving. Are not taught to drink in moderation, they end up binge drinking when they do consume alcohol (American Medical Association (AMA), "Minimum Legal Drinking Age," www.ama-assn.org (accessed June 4, 2009). If they had to take a class that taught them how to drink in moderation, the dangers of drinking too much, all the bad things that will come out of drinking and driving, and how bad alcohol is bad for your health if you abuse alcohol. Lowering the drinking age will also make alcohol less of a taboo, take away the thrill that many young people get from breaking the law, and make alcohol consumption a more normalized activity done in moderation rather than just being drinking. By making kids take the classes will make them more responsible and make them make wiser…show more content…
Most kids binge drink when they drink they don’t do it in moderation or casual drink. When kids drink it’s mostly on the weekend and parties so they want to have a fun good time as fast as they can so they drink the alcohol fast so it will hit them harder than just drinking them regularly. Binge drinking is associated with a serious social harm, economic costs as well as increased disease burden. Binge drinking is more common in males, during adolescence and young adulthood. Most binge drinkers are not familiar with the risks associated with binge drinking. Heavy regular binge drinking is associated with adverse effects on neurologic, cardiac, gastrointestinal, hematologic, immune, psychiatric and musculoskeletal organ systems. (Clark, DB.; Bukstein, O.; Cornelius, J. (2002). "Alcohol use disorders in adolescents: epidemiology, diagnosis, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacological treatment.” Paediatr Drugs 4 (8): 493–502). Up to one third of kids that binge drink has a six percent chance of reaching the limit of having an alcohol related substance use disorder. Approximately one in twenty five women binge drink during pregnancy, which can lead to fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Binge drinking during adolescence is associated with traffic accidents and other types of accident, violent behavior as well as suicide. (O'Connell, H; Lawlor, BA (October–December 2005). "Recent
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