Baseball Saved USorty Character Analysis

877 Words4 Pages
“C’mon, Shorty, you can do it!” A few words of encouragement from the main character’s teammate also imply discrimination. Shorty is not the main character’s name, but it’s used in lack of respect. In, Baseball Saved Us, written by Ken Mochizuki and illustrated by Dom Lee, the main character and his family is discriminated against, discriminated against because of his below average height for his age and their out casted cultural background. The discrimination leads to the intended and unintended message of the book. The author attempted to express perseverance through discrimination. The unintended messages in the book were minimal, but had to do with stereotypes; gender and racial. The mentioned characters in Baseball Saved…show more content…
The discrimination didn’t cease, in fact, it increased. Shorty still sat alone in the lunch room and still had food thrown at him. The book almost implied Shorty missed the internment camp. Once home, Shorty decided to join the baseball team. Shorty felt misplaced because he was one-of-a-kind, on his team and every team they played. “Jap” became Shorty’s temporary name while at away games. It reminded him of what life was like before entering the camps. He felt the hate and in came the racial stereotypes with words like “…the Jap is no good,” and “Easy out!” and “…he’s too small!” During one game, Shorty went up to bat. The pitcher’s sunglasses reminded him of the man in the tower at the camp. It encouraged him to take a step back, take a hard swing, and whack the ball over the fence for the game winning homerun. Shorty had persevered and succeeded despite discrimination. The last illustration in the book shows Shorty being accepted by his teammates because he helped win the game. In the end, every character Baseball Saved Us, written by Ken Mochizuki and illustrated by Dom Lee, succeeded. The characters achieved success through team victories, individual victories, and restoration of freedom. The author attempted to express perseverance through discrimination. The unintended messages in the book were minimal, but had to do with stereotypes; gender

More about Baseball Saved USorty Character Analysis

Open Document