Australian Participation In The 1960's

715 Words3 Pages
The 1960’s saw the rise of sociological, cultural and political protest movements across Australia which would influence Australian politics for years to come. These influences were reflected by mass protests and public demonstrations. This essay explains the major issues that motivated Australian protesters in the 1960’s; that is, campaigning against conscription and the Vietnam War, equality and independence for women in the workplace, primarily in obtaining fairer wages to their male counterparts and the recognition for rights of Indigenous Australians. These issues were reflective of wider international social movements, primarily in America, which vastly influenced Australian culture and politics during this era. The opinions and actions…show more content…
Although many Australians were confusingly divided over the issue of conscription, many protested against this act which conscripts were selected by lottery draw based on their date of birth. * Protesters against conscription believed that it forced young men to fight away from their home, knowing that many would be killed. They saw this as unfair and wrong to not only those men but their family and friends who loved them. * In 1965, the Save Our Sons (SOS) movement was established to abolish the National Service Act 1964. * They protested against conscription of Australian soldiers to fight in the Vietnam War and made men under the age of 21 (who were not entitled to vote) a focus of their campaign. * In that same year the Youth Campaign Against Conscription (YCAC) formed by young men who were subjected to conscription. * They fought by destroying their registration cards. This became a new form of resistance to conscription- active non-compliance. * The issue of conscription, as well as whether Australia should be in the war, caused a lot of national controversy and resulted in a lot of arguments for introducing…show more content…
* This affected approximately 18 per cent of women workers, mostly who were employed as teachers or nurses and cemented their rights to equal pay. This also changed the perception of women as well. Alongside the protests relating to the Vietnam War and women’s rights, Indigenous disputes became a factor. The Modern Land Rights Movement and the establishment of the first national association of Indigenous Australians, namely, the Federal Council for the Advancement of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders (FCAATSI) became increasing known to proclaim their justice. * The Commonwealth Electoral Act was modified in 1962 to allow Indigenous Australians the right to enroll and vote in federal elections. * In 1966, a man called Vincent Lingiari was followed by 200 Gurindji men, women and children who protested against not only land rights but also poor wages and intolerable working conditions. This nine year struggle eventually became a successful
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