Australian Identity

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WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AN AUSSIE? The Australian Newspaper Date 20th February 2012 * “There is no ‘real’ Australia waiting to be uncovered. A national identity is an invention. - Richard White (1981) Mikaela French Our national identity has developed over the years: From colonial beginnings to the wild gold rush days, to the men of the land and to the end of World War 1. Have these past experiences somehow been responsible for creating Australian stereotypes in today’s society? Australians have developed many unique characteristics acquired from our ancestors and previous generations. This has resulted in us being stereotyped in many ways. From our humble beginnings through to the end of World War 1 we have been recognised as a nation…show more content…
They were also known to joke, play pranks, and share a laugh with each other. This formed a trait called larrikinism. Australia’s everyday working class men risked everything to save their ‘mates’ during the war. In challenging times males often relied on each other. This is a traditional Aussie term called 'mateship.' This concept of mateship developed significantly from the beginning of WW1.This notion of friendship brought Australian’s together as one. It symbolised what mates went through together; pain, sorrow as well as victory and love. Our nation came together for the first time since WW1 and Australian's believe this is how we became known the world over as Aussies. We are very hospitable, and prepared to always lend a helping hand. The Aussie trait of helping others influenced us in volunteering our country to help Britain in times of war. Although we did not have to be a part of World War 1 we still wanted to lend a hand. WW1 established Australia as a country, with a diehard spirit, a unique and distinctive culture, beliefs and way of life. Another important aspect of World War 1 was the role women played in shaping our identity. Traditionally the role of women was recognized as looking after the children, cooking and cleaning. This role changed quite quickly as women in Australia were employed in a variety of jobs, left vacant by the men who were sent overseas to fight in…show more content…
These characteristics have unquestionably shaped us who we are today, and the various Aussie stereotypes we are known for. Even in today's society we still have 'mateship', larrikinism and appear to have a much laid back culture recognized the world over. Our women are also recognized for being very independent and empowering, with these traits shown to the world by one of our female political leaders. All of these stereotypes still exist today and have made us who we are –
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