Atticus Finch Is the Same in His House as He Is on the Public Streets'

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‘Atticus Finch is the same in his house as he is on the public streets.’ Discuss. In Harper Lees ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, Atticus Finch a respectful and fair man of Maycomb acts no different in his house as he does on the public streets. He continues the practice of his strong moral (PUT IN QUOTE FROM ONLINE) in his house to Jem and Scout and also in the court room. One of Atticus strongest values is seeing everyone as equal and should be treated in the same manner which is why he sees no reasoning to act any different in front of his family or other members of the community. Throughout ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Atticus Finch acts the same in his house around Jem and Scout as he does outside with everyone else. As a lawyer, Atticus represents exactly what someone working in the justice. He is not prejudice; he is fair, looks at all situation from different angles and doesn’t hold any grudges. ‘Atticus Finch is the same in his house as he is on the public streets’ and this is also true for his behaviour in the courtroom. Atticus is a very skilled lawyer and this is proven when we points out that Bob Ewell is lying about Tom Robinson, without being rude and impolite. Atticus treats everyone with great manners and kindness be it Jem or Scout or the man he is fighting in court. Be it in his own home, or out on the streets of Maycomb, Atticus Finch has the same values and respect for people, be it his children or the African American members. Atticus doesn’t favour anyone; be it his children or even the Ewell family. As Atticus said, “I do my best to love everybody” (112) and because of this attitude, Atticus sees there to be no reason to why he should act any different around different people. Unlike others in the Community who are racist and define people by class and social statues, Atticus views everyone as individuals and sees them for who they are, even

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