Article Review over Curtis, Wayne. belle epoxy. Preservation Magazine, 32-39

734 WordsJul 8, 20093 Pages
Curtis, Wayne. “belle epoxy.” Preservation Magazine, 32-39 Wayne Curtis the author of this article brings points about what our world things of art and history to us by using one of the most popular cities as an example. Las Vegas is a city that is visited by millions of people every year. The town is basically one huge theme park. His main example is the Venetian Hotel, which is designed to look like Venice. In the article Curtis is speaking with Bob Hlusak who vice president and design manager at Treadway Industries Inc. Treadway is a company that specializes in replicating pieces for many hotels and theme parks. He tells us how successful the business is and how the artist actually do all the work. He also goes in to depth about Treadway Industries and how they pioneered the way for sculpting foam. They were the first to come up with a machine to actually do thing. They hooked the design computer up to hot-wire foam cutting machines and with the help of Disney imaginers have come up with some advanced technology for intricate designs. One of his main questions is what is the meaning of “authentic” . He comments, “ The word authentic is thrown around in Las Vegas like a one-dollar chips. There’s an “authentic cantina” at a restaurant in Mandalay Bay, and “authentic pirate sea battle” at Treasure Island, and “authentic Italian ice cream parlor” at the Bellagio.” )Pg. 39). Curtis’s reason’s that the word authentic has changed meaning over the years, “ The dictionary definition of “real, actual. Genuine (as opposed to imaginary, pretend)” now seems quaintly old-fashioned, like “cellular” defined only as a term of biology the new Meaning? Something Authentic is simply something that looks as you imagine it might, based on a lifetime of movies and television and glossy advertisements in magazines.” (Pg. 39.) Curtis’s thesis “ Has the new Las Vegas, with

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