Arguments For Immigration Reform

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Immigration Reform Illegal immigration has always been a problem that existed throughout our nation’s history. Till today, it continues to be an issue that many people can’t come to consensus with. Further more; the problem progressed in to something that is irreversible, like cancer, that started to spread quickly and state leaders are doing everything they can to come to a compromise on this issue. A solution to this problem that some suggest is immigration reform or proposal to increase legal immigration while decreasing illegal immigration. This reform will enable illegal immigrants to become U.S. citizens. There are two views on this predicament, one view which comes from conservative group that opposes granting illegal immigrants…show more content…
They believe that it will provide a legal way for immigrants to enter and exit the country if they come here for work. “This is important because it would create a valve by which immigrants could take advantage of jobs in the United States without overloading the country with an influx of new citizens.” On the contrary, according to Ana Avendano, Associate General Counsel, Immigrant Worker Program says, “We're seeing a destruction of the good, solid, middle-class job in the United States in general. So what we're seeing with these temporary worker programs are that just as much as employers are outsourcing certain aspects of their work right now, they were trying to use these temporary worker programs, these aid programs, as a way to in source exploitable workers. And that will create a secondary class of workers, and the more that these programs grow in size, grow in scope, the bigger that secondary class of workers gets. Whenever you have a class of workers that can be easily exploited, that has a downward negative impact on all workers' wages, regardless of citizenship status, regardless of gender, race. Workers as a whole suffer”…show more content…
The polls show that if illegal aliens were given amnesty and began to pay taxes and use services like households headed by legal immigrants with the same education levels, the estimated annual net fiscal deficit would increase from $2,700 per household to nearly $7,700, for a total net cost of $29 billion (cis.org). I think it is possible to reach a solution that everyone can agree on. Although the pathway to citizenship was one of the most controversial provisions of the Senate bill, the poll found the idea was backed by 63% of those surveyed — even by 58% of those who identified themselves as conservatives and 65% of Republicans. The survey question specified that, under the proposal, citizenship would be available only to those who register their presence in the U.S., have no criminal record, pay a fine, get fingerprinted and learn English, among other requirements. Those conditions helped ease concerns among some Republicans who feared a less stringent policy would amount to amnesty
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