Argumentative Essay: The End Of NASCAR

1137 Words5 Pages
The End of NASCAR Most people are familiar with a particular drink, known as white lightning. If that’s the case, most have either heard of it or even had a drink of it. But what most don’t know is white lightning played a big part in the sport of NASCAR. How is that possible, one might ask. The history of NASCAR can be traced way back to 1794, which happened to be during the Whiskey Rebellion. The government had put a tax on whiskey, which upset farmers, and instead of paying for whiskey, the farmers decided to brew their own. Their home brew became known as moonshine, because it would glisten in the moonlight as they packaged it. Farmers sold their moonshine for profit, but it had to be delivered in the dark of the night, so as not to get…show more content…
NASCAR has come up with a new car which they call “The Car of Tomorrow.” It has been completely redesigned as compared to the older cars of yesteryear. The car has a new rear spoiler which looks familiar to what one would find on a halfway finished ricer car. The body and front end are all made the same way, therefore, all the cars look the same. The bad side to this new car, it’s ugly. Tony Stewart, famed race car driver, has referred the newly engineered car as a “flying brick.” Tony Stewart is not alone in his opinion, many other races share the same feeling towards the car. It doesn’t look any more like a stock car than the old ones did (Smith). In a recent interview with Tony Stewart for a newspaper quoted that the new car “could become the biggest disaster NASCAR has faced in a long…show more content…
The engines are a naturally-aspirated 358 cubic inch Chevrolet small block engine and are put in every car, even the new and less popular Toyota Camry (What makes NASCAR engines different…). There may be some advantages in redesigning the car, for safety reasons. One big change was the design of the roll cage, and its main purpose is to protect the driver in a crash or pile up. It has been built stronger and designed to prevent cockpit intrusion. The result of a bigger rollcage is a bigger greenhouse, so the driver has a better view of their environment. The fully enclosed driveshaft tunnel is a definite safety improvement, but to go as far as completely enclosing it, wouldn’t you think that seems a bit much? There may have been improvements in safety, but only so much can be done to a car. That creates an oxymoron of “safer racecar”, because it just doesn’t exist. Driving around turn 4, spinning out, and hitting the wall at 160 miles an hour is still going
Open Document