Anu Garg Another Word A Day Analysis

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Another Word A Day Also by Anu Garg A Word A Day: A Romp through Some of the Most Unusual and Intriguing Words in English Another Word A Day An All-New Romp through Some of the Most Unusual and Intriguing Words in English Anu Garg John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2005 by Anu Garg. All rights reserved Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey Published simultaneously in Canada Composition by Navta Associates, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either…show more content…
It was a time when officers were gentlemen, and Cardigan held the view, as did many of his peers, that killing and fighting were not gentlemanly, and should be left to the enlisted ranks. It is said that he led the charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava armed only with a cigar. When he had brought his men face-to-face with the Russian gunners, he considered his duty done. He rode back alone, leaving his men to muddle through as best they could. (Source: Byron Farwell, Mr. Kipling’s Army.) —Marshal Merriam,Antioch, California Yarborough (YAHR-bur-o) noun In a card game, a hand in which no card is above a nine. After Charles Anderson Worsley, 2nd Earl of Yarborough (1809–1897), who is said to have bet 1,000 to 1 against the occurrence of such a hand. ● “Many players know the odds against holding a Yarborough— a hand with no card above a nine—are 1827 to 1. But though today’s deal arose in Reno at the ACBL’s Spring Championships, I doubt anyone could have quoted the odds against it: South and East both had Yarboroughs!” —Buffalo (N.Y.) News The best writing is rewriting. —E. B. W H I T E , author…show more content…
But conspectus is not necessarily opposite to prospectus. As for congress and progress, well, I’m not so sure. magnum opus (MAG-num OH-puhs) noun A great work of literature, music, art, etc., especially the finest work of an individual. From Latin magnum opus, from magnum, neuter of magnus (large), opus (work). ● “Bespectacled, bearded and balding, Mr. [Grigory] Chkhartishvili is faintly ill at ease about fame. For years, he earned his living translating Japanese literature and working on what he still considers his magnum opus, a gloomy book entitled ‘The Writer and Suicide.’ His idea of a good time is to stroll around a
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