Analyzing Sources: Breaking The Cycle Of Poverty In The United States

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Running head: ANALYZING SOURCES DENYING THE KEY TO SUCCESS Benjamin Manning Axia College of Western International University COM112 Utilizing information in college writing Lorna Maloney 29 January 2006 Analyzing Sources Students from low income families need as much assistance as possible to help them break the cycle of poverty. Welfare and other financial support programs are systems that were designed to help struggling families get back on their feet and support themselves. A family who receives the majority of its money from government assistance typically has children who will do the same. (Rector, 1996) Today, the only way to break this cycle of poverty is through higher education. There are far too…show more content…
However, many of them are so specialized that only a few students apply and even fewer yet receive any substantial amount of assistance. This leaves far too many students behind in their quest to improve themselves, earn more money, and eventually put that money back into the economy. Financial burdens are not the only obstacle that low income families face when making the decision to start college. Geographically low income students face certain challenges as well, as reliable transportation is difficult to find for most low income families. This combined with the fact that most colleges are not located near impoverished areas prevents many welfare recipients from attending college. Even if they were able to find a way to afford college, it may be physically impossible for them to attend because of the neighborhood they live in. The cost issue of going to school obviously has an effect on the decision of whether to attend school or not. It appears that when there are fewer jobs available low income students are more likely to return to college. (London 2005) Those students who live in states with more educational benefits are also more likely to enroll. If we can provide low income families even more benefits without pressuring them to go to work as well, more of them would enroll and eventually earn there degree. This would effectively end the cycle of welfare dependency for those…show more content…
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