Analyze Continuities and Changes in Patterns of Interactions Along the Silk Roads from 200 B.C.E. to 1450 C.E.

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In 200 B.C.E. is when the Han Dynasty first established Silk Roads and since the beginning of the establishment, all the way through 1450 C.E., Silk Roads were deeply an important change that happened to connect China in the east to the empires of the west. Although over tim different products and goods were changed including trading partners, the exchange of innovations and culture which led to cultural diffusion, became a continuity as well. Roughly around 200 B.C.E, the Silk Roads came into use. By that time, they linked the Roman Empire to the Han Dynasty. Both empires dominated their individual region and were very powerful and substantial. Which means goods and products like spices, rice, tea and pottery were traded with Roma for gold and silver. During the Pax Romana and the Han Golden Age, the roads were heavily being used. Around 500 C.E., Western Rome fell. East part of Rome rose as the Byzantine Empire, which lasted for nearly a thousand years. The Silk Roads were reestablished again under the Islamic Umayyad and Abbasid Dynasty in the west and the Tang Song in the east. Products such as, paper, movable type printing and gunpowder were continuity but over time different products were changed Muslim traders in Africa and brought gold, silver. The trade patterns remained the same in previous years. Not only goods and products were traded through out years, but even more importantly was the cultural interactions and diffusion that took place. For instance, the Muslim empires adapted paper money from the Chinese. This was very important when most of Asia was taken over by the Mongols. Kublai Khan expanded the network of the Silk Roads, trading heavily with the Dehli Sultanate and Ilkhanate to the south and south west, appropriately. The Dehli Sultanate was the name of Dehli-based kingdoms that ruled over large parts of India. The Ilkhanate was a

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