An Analysis Of J. B. Priestley's An Inspector Calls

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An inspector Calls An inspector calls was written in 1945, therefore ahead of the time it has been set. The play has “lasting appeal” for audiences in 1945 and 2014 as many of the key areas within the play are still relevant in our society. To identify the plays lasting appeal, I will be exploring its themes, characters, sense of morality, political ideology, setting and dramatic devices. Within an inspector calls, there are many different types of characters who are presented to the audience, all with contrasting personalities. Mr birling is the head of the family, and a capitalistic Business man. His views are firmly based on the political ideology that he supports, capitalism. Although, within our current era, many countries within Europe…show more content…
He applies them effectively as a dramatic device, in that he uses them to show how the birling family are cold, distant family are very well off, alluding to “dessert plates” and “champagne glasses” as well as other expensive items. There is also a sense of formality and distance between the family members as he writes that men are in “tails and white ties” and that it is “not cosy and homelike”. This atmosphere appeals to today’s society as there is a large comparison in relationships between family’s members from both different eras. As many of today’s audience have family moral’s based on their religion and faith, the Birling’s are not as relaxed about what they choose their family to believe in, therefore sociable times within the family are now more formal and politically based. Dramatic Irony is also used in many ways as a dramatic device. It is used to promote the inspector yet mock Mr Birling. In Mr Birling’s speech at the beginning of the play, he proudly states that “as a hard-headed businessman” he thinks that “there isn’t a chance of war” and that the Titanic is “absolutely…show more content…
He uses Arthur Birling as a voice for capitalism, who is ridiculed by the inspector, a representative of socialism. The dialogue between them shows this, as the inspector twists what birling says. For example, when the inspector says “I’m sorry but you asked me a question”, and Birling says the inspector previously asked him an unnecessary question, the Inspector replies “It’s my duty to ask questions”. Priestly uses this symbolism as framework for the political ideology battle each character has with the inspector. As the political Ida of capitalism has corrupted the Birling family, Priestly shows the audience how the inspector, the voice of socialism, constantly out-wits the birling’s. This therefore appeals to the audience as within today’s society there are still large segregations between what political ideology people choose to believe in. In conclusion I feel that the play “an inspector calls” creates lasting appeal as it interests today’s audience within all aspects of life, and how morals and ideas portrayed within the ply can be compared to peoples everyday situations. As political ideology as the largest theme within the play, today’s society are interested not just in today’s politics, but how morals and politics shaped the world previous to their
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