Alienation And Loneliness In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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In Mary Shelley’s book Frankenstein she hits on many important themes. The most important of them all is the alienation and the loneliness of Victor Frankenstein and his creation; and how it influences the ending of the book. In Frankenstein, isolation only leads to despair, Alienation is the sense of not belonging, either to a community or to one’s own sense of self, alienation is the feeling of being alienated from other people, a separation resulting from hostility. And loneliness, which comes from alienating oneself, is a feeling of depression resulting from being alone, which is a part of alienation. The two characters in the book that were alienated and lonely the most were Victor Frankenstein and his creature. But the person that…show more content…
The monster begs his creator to listen to him and proceeds to explain in detail how he has observed and imitated the ways of man, but shunned because of his ugliness and is force to wonder over glaciers and hide in caves of ice because these are the only dwellings “man does not grudge.” The world does not see him as he really is. His narrative is punctuated by outcries of loneliness. (Draper, 3211) I think that this means that the creature was alienated so much that it resulted in him hiding in caves because these are places that people rarely come. Eventually being alone leads him into…show more content…
Frankenstein kept during the four months previous to his creating monster. Thus, the monster was able to track down Frankenstein, and, using the analogy from paradise lost, the creature realized that he had no eve to soothe his sorrows or share his thoughts: “I was alone,” he says, and “I remembered Adam’s supplication to his creator. But where was mine? He had abandoned me, and in the bitterness of my heart, I cursed him. “Thus again, throughout this narrative, we become ever more responsive to the creature’s isolation, his rejection, and his abandonment than we do to Frankenstein’s feelings. (Umland,
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