Alexander Whetstone: Understanding A Culture

2183 Words9 Pages
Whetstone 1 Alexander Whetstone Professor Risch English 100 Research paper Understanding a culture is more difficult than it seems to be, because an observer can define a lot of cultures with stereotypes in mind. No one that I know would proudly call their self a redneck unless they are directly pointing to any specific archetype directed towards them. Others are sucked into lifestyles that are completely contrasted to their particular personalities and beliefs, such as homeless people. This is a culture that completely intrigues me into researching why humans live this way and how they manage to do it. During my younger days, I use to perceive the homeless as a problem consisting of the lower class society full of failures,…show more content…
If I would have passed by this event without the current research pulsing through my mind, I fear I would have not have even put in the effort to think twice about the matter, but I noticed something that neither my search for knowledge or ignorance of that knowledge could satisfy, unless I were to find out myself. One group of homeless victims stood out to me, so I began to deeply observe the situation even further. I could not help but notice that this was not just a group of homeless people, but rather a husband, wife, and daughter, and to even top things off, the father of this family was recording the entire situation with his Apple I-Phone. The homeless family was just a sad wake up call to the actual impact of homelessness, but what intrigued my attention, towards the study of the culture at least, was the fact that this homeless man had an I-Phone. How could a homeless man afford an I-Phone and not put in the extra cent for a considerably decent place for his family? Was there perhaps another aspect towards the reason they choose to live this way? Amazingly enough, these questions were answered by the two unmistakable words, ”Vietnam Veteran”, which we all know that this man, along with many other veterans, apparently did not receive any aid by the government, even after all of the sacrifices he made for his countries freedom (Brende 1-2). So the only way this man could have…show more content…
Bent Rail Foundation, 2007. Brende, Joel Osler., and Erwin Randolph. Parson. Vietnam Veterans: The Road to Recovery. New York: Plenum, 1985. Print. "The Conversation (11/20): Homeless Programs." Hawaiipublicradio. N.p., 20 Nov. 2012. Web. 21 Nov. 2012. <http://www.hawaiipublicradio.org/content/conversation-1120-homeless-programs>. Gowan, Teresa. Hobos, Hustlers, and Backsliders: Homeless in San Francisco. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2010. Print. Jencks, Christopher. The Homeless. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1994. Print. "UH Mānoa Center on the Family, DHS Release Report on Homeless Services." Hawaii Reporter. N.p., 13 Nov. 2012. Web. 21 Nov. 2012.
Open Document