Alexander III's Influence In Ancient Rome

974 Words4 Pages
Although the Romans would rule more land, no one man has ever conquered such a vast territory in as short period of time as Alexander III or Alexander the Great. Before his death at the age of 32 he had ruled over most of the known world. Alexander did more than just win on the battlefield. Taught in the classic traditions of Greece, he brought an enlightened form of leadership to the regions he conquered. Had he lived his empire might have been a truly magnificent one and changed the course of history. In spite of his untimely demise, he ensured that the influence of Greece reached far beyond its borders, leaving an indelible mark in the ancient world. Macedon was a rough, warlike country to the north of Greece, and though the Macedonians…show more content…
Alexander gained the support of the Macedonian nobility and consolidated his power in Greece. With a lightning-quick strike he captured Thebes and killed some 6,000 of its defenders. After that, he faced no serious opposition from the city-states, and embarked on a mission that had been Philip's dream: conquest of the vast Persian Empire to the east. Alexander's army moved into Asia Minor. Eventually, Alexander and his army passed through the ancient Phrygian capital of Gordian. In that city was a chariot tied with a rope so intricately knotted that no one could untie it. According to legend, the fabled King Midas had tied the Gordian Knot, and whoever could untie it would go on to rule the world. Alexander simply cut the knot. In a way the legend was fulfilled when Alexander took over control of the known world at the time. The Persian emperor Darius came to meet him with a force of 140,000 on his way to conquer Persia. Darius chose to wait it out, letting Alexander's forces come to him, and Alexander, taking this as a sign of weakness, charged on the Persians. Alexander nearly got himself killed, but the Battle of Issus was a decisive victory for the Greeks. Darius fled, leaving Alexander in control of the entire western portion of the Persians'…show more content…
However, the adventure was unraveling him both physically and emotionally. He caught a fever, and was soon unable to move or speak. During the last days of his life, Alexander—the man of action—was forced to lie on his bed while all his commanders filed by in solemn tribute to the great man who had led them where no conqueror had ever gone. On June 13, 323 B.C., he died. Alexander's empire did not hold. The generals who succeeded him lacked his vision, and they spent the remainder of their careers fighting over the spoils of his conquests. Seleucus gained control over Persia, Mesopotamia, and Syria, where an empire under his name would rule for many years, and Ptolemy established a dynasty of even longer standing in Egypt. His descendants ruled until 30 B.C, when the last of his line, Cleopatra was defeated by a new and even bigger empire,
Open Document