African Americans In The Late 1800s

699 Words3 Pages
Black Americans gained their freedom in the 13th Amendment in December 1865. Historians however do not agree about whether this led to an improvement in their lives by the end of the 19th Century. This assignment will decide whether or not life improved. I will discuss the new organisation that arose such as Ku Klux Klan and the Freedman’s Bureau. Many Historians say that life improved for the Black Americans. They claim that this is because of The Freedman’s Bureau. The Freedman’s Bureau was an organisation set up by the government in 1865. It organised education, health care, orphanages and found work of a reasonable standard for ex-slaves. It helped improve literacy among black people. By 1870, 21 % of black people in the south could read.…show more content…
They also gave many reasons for thinking this. They claim that one of the reasons that this is true is because of the Ku Klux Klan. In the years following the civil war. Terrorist groups such as the White League and the Ku Klux Klan were formed. The KKK was set up as a secret society. Its aim was to make sure that white people controlled society by terrifying black people and ethnic minorities. Also after 1877 many schools for black people were forced to close by white racists. Some schools were burned and students were badly beaten up. Furthermore in the Southern states of USA the abolition movement was resented. Plantation owners were unwilling to end slavery because it provided them with a free labour force. Many white Americans had justified slavery by thinking of slaves as racially inferior, as people without human needs, rights or dignity. The legal system had supported these racist views, and the rights of the plantation owners for many years. After 1890 many Southern governments passed a series of laws that set up a system of segregation that would last until the mid-twentieth century. This system meant that black people were forced to live separately from white…show more content…
More than 2000 people were lynched or burned in the last two decades of the ninetieth century. Southern newspapers would advertise these executions, and even children would be taken to lynchings. People had their photographs taken with the victims. In the south =, where racial hatred remained a problem, black people’s new rights were protected by northern soldiers who remained after the Civil War. When these soldiers left in 1877, many state governments chose to persecute black people and limit their rights. Despite the laws of the federal government, they soon took away black people’s rights to vote. Last but not least the systems of sharecroppers spent more than their share was worth and fell heavily into
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