African American Soldiers

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African American Soldiers Throughout the Years Dave Anderson, III COM/172 Elements of University Composition and Communication II May 16. 2012 Donna Hooley AFRICAN AMERICAN SOLDIERS PAGE 1 African Americans have served in the military by or within the United States including the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War, the Civil War, the Spanish American War, the World Wars, the Korean War, the Vietnam War the Gulf War, and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. They have also served in minor conflicts that arose outside the United States. African American slaves and free Blacks have served both sides during the war. Black soldiers served in…show more content…
They escorted the U. S. mail, stagecoaches, built railroads and kept peace where they could among the Indians. From the Battle of San Juan five Medals of Honor were earned. General Shafter who participated in the Spanish-American war stated clearly that he preferred “Buffalo Soldiers” to their white counterparts. There were five African-American Volunteer Army units and seven African American National Guard units during the Spanish American War. Of these units three served in Cuba and suffered no losses to combat. The armed forces remained segregated through World War I. During the armistice with Germany on November 1918, more than 350,000 African Americans had served with the American Expeditionary Force on the Western Front. Again most African American units were there for support roles and not combat roles. Corporal Freddie Stowers of the 371st Infantry Regiment that was seconded to the 157th French Army division posthumously received the Medal of Honor. He was the only African American to be so honored for actions in World War…show more content…
The blue ticket was a form of administrative discharge to replace two previous discharge classifications. Blue discharge recipients frequently faced difficulties obtaining employment and were routinely denied benefits under the G.I. Bill by the Veterans Administration (VA). In 1945, The Pittsburgh Courier called a debate in regards to this method of treatment. There was so much negative controversy that The House Committee on Military Affairs held hearings criticizing the VA for discrimination and congress in 1947 discontinued the blue discharge. The VA; however, continued its practice of denying the G. I. Bill benefits to blue-tickets. Jesse L Brown became the U. S. Navy’s first black aviator in October 1948. He was killed when his plane was shot down during the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. The U. S. Navy honored Jesse Brown by naming en escort ship after him-The U.S.S. Jesse L. Brown. The Vietnam War saw many who captured accomplishments, including twenty-two who received the Medal of Honor for their actions. On August 21, 1968 with the posthumous award of Medal of Honor, U. S Marine James Anderson, Jr. became the first African-American U. S. Marine recipient of the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions and sacrifice of his life. On December 10, 1968, U. S. Army Captain Riley Leroy Pitts became the first African American commissioned officer to be awarded the
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