African American Declaration Of Independence

1304 Words6 Pages
“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” This is stated in the United States Declaration of Independence, which is a document written in 1776 that is important to U.S. history. Although this is stated in the Declaration of Independence, many groups of Americans have been denied these rights. One group that is clearly deprived of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness were the African Americans. Even if they were a part of this country they didn’t have say to our society, they were denied numerous rights, and in order to attain these rights, they made many efforts to gain…show more content…
Wells gave speeches all around the United States stating lynching innocent people is a very brutal thing to do and that they should stop. She was brave enough to stand up for the group, knowing that she could be lynched. "Our country's national crime is lynching…In fact, for all kinds of offenses- and, for no offenses- from murders to misdemeanors, men and women are put to death without judge or jury." These lines were stated in Ida B. Well’s newspaper to give attention to Americans that lynching should be banned immediately before more African Americans are lynched. Therefore, both Mary McLeod Bethune and Walter Francis White tried to convince Franklin D. Roosevelt to support the Costigan-Wagner bill which is a bill that would punish sheriffs who failed to protect their prisoners from lynch mobs in 1935. As a result of Roosevelt supporting it, lynching was banned towards the late 19th…show more content…
Board of Education.” The “Brown vs. Board of Education” represented a young African American girl named Linda Brown who has to travel around town to get to a school for African American. Therefore, the court ordered all schools to desegregate all school. Many parents and schools didn’t like the fact that they would be sharing a school with African Americans. From there the “Little Rock Nine” was formed. Little Rock Nine was a group of nine African American students who began the integration of the Little Rock, Arkansas, public school system. All these nine students were threatened, and got picked on at school. But they all refused fight back; they all used non-violent methods to overcome these obstacles. At first state guards didn’t allow African American to enter the school, but once federal troops was in action, Little Rock Nine were allowed safely into Central High School. Though they had federal troops protecting them, half of the time Little Rock Nine were still mistreated. The same method was used after a seamstress and NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) worker named Rosa Parks got arrested for not giving up her seat for a white man. Under the command of Martin Luther King J.R., African Americans used non-violent method to solve this problem. They decide not to take the public buses, but to ride bikes, carpooled cars, and walked to work. Soon this turned into the
Open Document