AP US History DBQ

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| I. Jefferson's Presidency A. Turbulent Times: Election and Rebellion 1. In the election of 1800, results remained uncertain from November to February 1801 as voters in the electoral college, using the single balloting system to choose both president and vice president, gave equal numbers of votes to Jefferson and to his running mate, Senator Aaron Burr. term in office, but governing after 1804 was not easy; France and England, then embroiled in war, each warned America not to ship arms to the other. 2. Britain acted on those threats in 1806, stopping American ships, inspecting cargoes for military aid to France, and seizing suspected deserters from the British navy, along with many Americans; ultimately 2,500 American sailors were…show more content…
Women's Status in the Early Republic A. Women and the Law 1. The Anglo-American view of women, implanted in British common law, was that wives had no independent legal or political personhood. 2. The legal doctrine of feme covert held that a wife's civic life was completely subsumed by that of her husband. 3. State legislatures generally passed up the opportunity to rewrite the laws of domestic relations, even though they redrafted other British laws in light of republican principles. 4. The one aspect of family law that did change in the early Republic was divorce: Before the Revolution, only New England jurisdictions recognized a limited right to divorce; but by 1820, every state except South Carolina did so. 5. Nevertheless, divorce was difficult and states upheld the institution of marriage to protect persons they thought of as naturally dependent, and to regulate the use and inheritance of property. 6. Legal enforcement of marriage as an unequal relationship played a major role in maintaining gender inequality in the nineteenth century. 7. Single adult women could own and convey property, make contracts, initiate lawsuits, and pay taxes; they could not vote, serve on juries, or practice law, so their civil status was limited. 8. None of the legal institutions that structured white gender relations applied to black slaves who, as property themselves, could not freely consent to any contractual obligations, including marriage. B. Women…show more content…
Monroe and Adams A. From Property to Democracy 1. Presidential elections were somewhat removed from the ordinary voters because the Electoral College chose the president, but state elections generated great popular involvement and pressure for greater democratization swept into presidential elections from 1824 onward. 2. In the 1780s twelve of the thirteen original states enacted landed property qualifications for voting. 3. In the 1790s Vermont became the first state to enfranchise all adult males and four more states soon broadened suffrage considerably. 4. Between 1800 and 1830 the trend for democratization gripped all the states. 5. Both political philosophy and practical politics were entwined in these debates: who are “the people” in a government founded on popular sovereignty, and whose party or interest group gains the most from expanded suffrage? 6. Many new western states abandoned property qualifications altogether. 7. Heated battles over extending suffrage took place in East Coast states where expanding numbers contended with entrenched landed political elites who favored the status quo. 8. After the War in 1812, ten of the original states, including Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York, abolished the freehold qualification and opened the franchise to all who paid tax or rendered militia service. 9. Several states managed to delay expanded suffrage for two more decades, but landowners found it increasingly difficult to
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