A Comparison on the Colonization Techniques of England and Spain and the Resulting Outcomes

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A Comparison on the Colonization Techniques of England and Spain and the resulting outcomes Spain and England are known leaders of the Colonization of the New World. Both countries had a very different approach to how they colonized the New World, and both of them reaped different benefits from colonization. Spain had started their colonization process in 1492 when Christopher Columbus discovered the New World; in 1493 Spain had established their first Colony of Hispaniola. Almost 100 years later, in 1587 England entered the arena with their first settlement on Roanoke Island. This establishment quickly collapsed and the first permanent English colony of Jamestown was established 20 years later in 1607. With over a 100 year head start on England it would make sense that Spain capitalized the most on the New World; however it is quite the opposite. The differences in the colonization process helped England capitalize more by giving them the resources needed to bring them into the Industrial Revolution, and led Spain into a period of decline. There are many differences in how England and Spain colonized the new world. These differences include; the location of the colonized land, the treatment and relationship of the natives, reason for colonization, and the capitalization of the natural resources. The first one that will be addressed is the location of the colonized land. England colonization was on the east coast of modern day United States of America, while Spain’s colonization spanned from California, through Texas, and all the way down to Chile/Argentina. This land incorporated all of Central America and most of Southern America while England’s land was just a sliver down the East coast. By having such a small portion of the New World, England was able to focus in on it and see the potential it possessed. Another one of the differences was the

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