3 Day Tramp Case Study

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Dear Mrs Anderson and the QHS Board of Trustees, On the 21st/23rd of May our year 12 P.E/O.E class went on a 3 day tramp to Whare Flat. There was a lot of Risk Management Strategies and steps planed beforehand and during the tramp to insure the safety of the year12s, teachers and the polytechnic students that were leading the 3 day tramp. I am going to discuss and analyse these strategies and steps under the headings People, Equipment and Environment. When going on a tramp it is very important that the person or people that are leading it are experienced trampers. The 6 polytechnic students that took us tramping were all doing an outdoor adventure diploma, so this meant that they had gone on many tramps before and we qualified to take our…show more content…
Before the 3 day tramp our teachers had us write a RAM/SAP. A SAP stands for Safety Action Plan; by writing a SAP it made me think about things that could go wrong and how I could prevent it from happening. An example of something that I wrote in my SAP that I thought could go wrong was an injury during the tramp. What could go wrong? - Someone could fall and hurt themselves. What could cause it to go wrong?- by not wearing the correct shoes on the tramp, doing something immature like running down hill on the tramp. A group with little discipline or who are unable to follow instructions are more likely to get into trouble on the tramp. How could we prevent it from going wrong? - make sure everyone has correct foot wear and being sensible on the tramp. Whose responsibility is it? - Mostly students, students should know if they have or need to hire the correct foot wear from school. Also students being year 12 should already have enough discipline and sensibility to know that running down a hill with a pack on is most likely going to end badly for them but teachers should still go over about how students are expected to behave during the 3 day…show more content…
Landscape is a factor that we planned for because when tramping Natural hazards and unfamiliar terrain can become very unsafe for experienced or inexperienced trampers. Natural hazards such as rivers are very common to come across and although it is suggested that when you plan your tramp, you should avoid crossing rivers or streams, you are most likely still going to come across a river or two. Rivers and streams can prove to be very dangerous if you do not know how to cross a river or stream. When on the 3 day tramp we came across a small river that we had to cross. One of the polytechnic students then took the time to tell us that “even though this is a small river, you never know if there are loss rocks or slippery things in it and to be safe the best way to always cross a river is by getting a partner and hooking one arm between their back and their pack and holding on to their pack”, the polytechnic student told us that this would give both of us a stable balance, just in case one of us slipped or lost our footing the other person would be able to help the them. This is a skill that anyone planning on doing a tramp should know how to do therefore it was a relevant risk factor that we had to manage. A very important risk factor involving environment was the NZ Environmental Care Code. The NZ Environmental Care Code is very relevant to the 3 day tramp because as we learnt that a lot of people like to visit their rural,
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