Woodrow Wilson´s Fourteen Points Essay

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A speech by President Woodrow Wilson, resumed to Fourteen Points, was preached to a joint session of Congress on January 8, 1918, to encourage the Germans to negotiate for a peace settlement to end World War I and intended to assure the country that the Great War was being fought for a moral cause and for postwar peace in Europe; although the fourteen points were not all approved and carried out, they became the basis for a peace program and it was because of them that Germany and her allies agreed to an armistice in November 1918. In January 8, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson addressed Congress proposing a fourteen-point program for world peace, believing that the enactment of the former would form the basis for a just, lasting peace that would improve the conditions of countries, both home and overseas, after World War I.
The address was intended to assure the United States that World War I was being fought for a moral cause and for postwar peace in Europe. In his statement, Wilson directly pinpointed what he believed were the causes for the Great War by calling for the abolition of secret treaties, a reduction in armaments, an adjustment in colonial claims in the interests of both native peoples and colonists, and freedom of the seas. Wilson also made proposals that he hoped would ensure world peace in the years to come. Most people in Europe accepted Wilson’s intervention, but most of his allied colleagues did not; holding skepticism against the applicability of Wilsonian idealism. The speech was majorly regarded as propaganda to encourage the Allies to victory. Copies were dropped behind German lines, to encourage the Central Powers to surrender in basis of a just settlement. Indeed, in October 1918, Wilson sent a letter to Prince Maximilian of Baden, the German imperial chancellor, requesting an immediate armistice and peace negotiation on the basis of the Fourteen Points. The speech was made without prior coordination or consultation with Wilson's...

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